Friday Five

Female-forward movies to watch under the full moon

A person lights a candle on an altar on the floor in front of a TV displaying a jack-o’-lantern.
A person lights a candle on an altar on the floor in front of a TV displaying a jack-o’-lantern.
Photo: NurPhoto/Getty Images

The season of spookiness has arrived, and what better way to get into the spirit(s) than watching some witchy, feminist flicks? As a witch and former film publicist, these are perhaps some of my favorite types of movies. This weekend, when Karla the Fog rolls in among Saturday’s blue full moon, I’ll be cozying up and enjoying some on-screen mystery and magic.

Of semi-important note, all of these movies pass the Bechdel test (at least two women talk to each other about something other than a man) with flying colors. …


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As if a pandemic, white supremacy, and an upcoming election weren’t spooky enough, 2020 also features a full “blue” moon on Halloween at 7:49 a.m. PT/10:49 a.m. ET. Though what is more unusual than a Blue Moon is having a full moon on Halloween — something to see only every 18–19 years. In all of the 21st century, we will only have six Halloween full moons: 2001, 2020, 2039, 2058, 2077, and 2096. If you combine a blue moon and a full moon on Halloween, it certainly adds extra astrological and witchy intrigue.

While several news outlets reported it has been 76 years since the last full moon on Halloween, this inaccuracy can confusion as with my calculations the last one was on October 31, 2001, at 9:43 p.m. PT. So those in later times zones missed it, though Pacific, Central, and Mountain Times have only waited 19 years.


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I don’t often use the word “disaster,” but when I do, I mean it. The word disaster comes from Greek and Roman meaning “ill-starred.” And that feels pretty accurate to me — currently many things feel unwell of sky and body.

Astrology can provide insight into patterns and larger cycles of experience…though I hesitate when using it for predictions. And as it relates to COVID-19, it almost feels too soon or insensitive to pretend to know what’s going to happen or the entire picture of this pandemic. Sometimes astrology gets used as a placeholder or scapegoat instead of feeling the discomfort of the unknown.


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While our modern Gregorian calendar begins on January 1, ancient Rome celebrated the new year near the Spring Equinox in March. In this timeline, February was dedicated to new year preparation and rituals that included purification, prayer, and cleansing-especially those related to fire. Eventually, the month became associated with the goddess Vesta, the goddess of hearth and home, and an ancient symbol of the sacred flame.

As one of the three virgin goddesses, Vesta reminds us of our holiness, wholeness, and the power inherent in our own life force energies separate from others-particularly romantic partners. In Greek translations, the word virgin meant “one unto herself,” as it referred to an unmarried maiden rather than the purely sexual connotation of our language today. …


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Retrogrades often evoke worry for many — especially Mercury Retrograde — though they are some of my fav astrological events. Rather than harbingers of doom and gloom, all retrograde transits are opportunities to choose free will over fear.

When a planet is retrograde, it appears to move backward in the sky, an illusion caused by the Earth passing by these slower moving planets. Retrogrades ask us to pay attention to something we may have missed in the past or uncover new ways of relating to specific planets. …


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With Libra season underway and the planets Venus and Mercury also in the loving sign, the time is ripe to talk about romantic relationship. A favorite topic of mine and astrology gives us a great tool for understanding our needs in love.

Many of us, myself included, tend to attract the same types of people over and over again as friends or lovers. This pattern of people whom we adore is often reflected by the astrological sign on our descendant or the house and sign opposite our rising between the 6th and 7th house. …


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While it may not always be obvious to spot a witch at first glance in the wild, the astrology natal chart can’t hide the omens.

Of course, what makes a witch means different things to different people. For some it means owning desire and sexuality, for others, it is an initiator into mysteries.

Other witches connect to Earth as a source of power or work with healing modalities or esotericism. And some of my favorites are those who use their powers to push back at patriarchy.

As an astrologer, I’ve noticed several cosmic patterns that correlate to these energies in the astrology natal chart and those who identify as a witch. …


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Image Greg Rakozy/Unsplash

Astrology is everywhere right now — horoscope books and apps and even “retrograde” memes (I’m looking at you, Mercury).

But although oversimplified or “pop” astrology can be fun, it rarely connects you to your personal astrology chart, which can be an important tool for healing and recovery. It’s a tool I wish I had been open to sooner. My astrology chart certainly would have helped me and reinforced my path to sobriety for the past 15 years.

When I first got sober, I thought astrology was too hippy-dippy for my taste. I didn’t like being put into small “Sun sign” boxes with a horoscope. Nothing I read ever resonated with me. However, I see now that my own cosmic blueprint could have been yet another way for me to feel more confident in my decision to get sober. …


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Eclipses represent a dance of light and dark–similar to our personal psyches and souls. They have rhythms and phases that we can predict and then at the same time feel chaotic. During an eclipse as the Sun, Moon, and Earth play in shadows, we too have the same opportunity. In ancient times, these astronomical events were viewed as mysterious omens or punishments from the Gods. Though now eclipses can be predicted down to the minute and know they usually occur in pairs every six months. …


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Photo by Kristopher Roller

Originally published at wanderlust.com on December 20, 2018.

Since before recorded history, civilizations in the Northern Hemisphere have marked the arrival of winter and the longest night of the year. While in ancient times it wasn’t possible to determine the exact degree when winter officially began. This year, the winter solstice occurs exactly on Friday, December 21 at 2:22 PM PST, 3:22 PM MST, or 5:22 PM EST.

The return of the Sun, or “son” in the case of Christmas, marks the winter solstice as a symbol of rebirth and reflection and has been celebrated in various ways around the world. In Pagan Scandinavia, Yule (or Yuletide), lasted 12 days and each night honored a different aspect of the Triple Goddess and the Sun God. During Shab-e Yalda for Iranians, people gather to protect each other from evil and welcome the triumph of the Sun God Mithra. Before the Chinese New Year Dong Zhi, meaning “Winter Arrives” and is believed to be the only day where everyone gets one year older. …

About

Rebecca M. Farrar, M.A.

Enchanted with Earth & Ether | M.A. Philosophy, Cosmology, Consciousness | Archetypal Astrologer & Writer | www.wildwitchwest.com

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